using The Pinkish, Purplish, Bluish Egg in speech therapy

Frequent Speech Sounds:

​/m/ initial
/er/ medial

Themes:

spring
eggs
believing in someone
not judging a book by its cover
learning a lesson
patience
imagination

Book Details:

Diverse Characters: N/A
Age Recommendation: Late Elementary, Middle School

The Pinkish, Purplish, Bluish Egg

By Bill Peet

Story told in verse about a dove who finds a large egg and takes it back to her nest. When it hatches, a strange creature emerges.

This unique rhyming spring book can be used in speech therapy to address social/emotional issues like not judging a book by its cover and helping those in need. It is also great for predicting, problem solving and for targeting figurative language as well as for describing! Discover more of the speech and language teaching concepts for using The Pinkish, Purplish, Bluish Egg in speech therapy below: 

Key Teaching concepts

Narrative Structure:

complete episode

Narrative Concepts:

vocabulary
sequencing

theme/message
predicting

problem solving
illustration study

character analysis      
figurative language
social/emotional
adjectives
phonological awareness

Sequencing:

order of events that leads to Owl’s approval of Zeke

Vocabulary:

depressed, instincts, brood, miserable, gloom, woebegone, inspection, hatch, frisky, plunked, flocking, bound, faint, gleefully, bewildered, limb, griffin, precaution, brute, exploded, furious, hollow, jeered, admire, marvel, quaked, scoundrels, bluff, region, bleak, bare

Character Analysis:

Myrtle is a dove who is lonely and sad because her kids have left the nest. She finds an egg and protects it despite others telling her not to. Myrtle takes care of the baby griffin even when other birds laugh at her and judge the bird by their preconceived notions.

Social/Emotional:

Myrtle has empathy for the baby and teaches the others to not judge a book by its cover.

Figurative Language:

similes (bouncing along like a big bowling ball, like a mad bumblebee)
metaphors (tear scoundrels to ribbons)

Grammar:

adjectives

Phonological Awareness:

rhyming

Predicting:

What do you think she will see?
How do you think she will get it back to her nest?
What do you think it will be?
What do you think the dove will do?
What do you think they will do with it?
How do you think she will teach Zeke to fly?
What do you think will be her set of rules to live by?
What do you think Zeke will do about the wolves?
What do you think his idea will be?

Problem Solving:

The animals find a strange egg and have to decide what to do with it. The dove takes care of the bird despite others saying not to. The bird facts trouble of his own with wolves and has to come up with a plan to solve it.

If you are interested in seeing other spring books to use in therapy, then check out the Narrative Teaching Points Book List for a printable copy.