speech and language teaching concepts for No Dragons for Tea in speech therapy

Frequent Speech Sounds:

/dr/ initial
/g/ medial

Themes:

community helpers
fire safety
dragons

Book Details:

Diverse Characters: Yes
Age Recommendation: Early Childhood, Elementary

No Dragons for Tea: Fire Safety for Kids (and Dragons)

By Jean E. Pendziwol

While out for a walk with her mom, a little girl has the surprise of her life — she meets a real, live, fire-breathing dragon! Now this dragon is nothing to be afraid of — in fact, he's so friendly that she invites him home for tea. But their afternoon snack is suddenly interrupted when the dragon sneezes and sets the table ablaze. Luckily, the girl knows just what to do, and she teaches her new friend to be fire smart, too. With its funny, rhyming verse and spunky illustrations, Dragons for Tea shows kids that learning about fire safety doesn't have to be scary. The story ends with “The Dragon's Fire Safety Rhyme” — a fun and easy way to remember what to do in case of fire.

This sweet and engaging fire safety-themed book can be used in speech therapy to address rhyming. It is also great for sequencing through the fire safety steps and targeting regular past tense verbs! Discover more of the speech and language teaching concepts for using No Dragons for Tea: Fire Safety for Kids (and Dragons) in speech therapy below:

Key Teaching concepts

Narrative Structure:

complete episode

Narrative Concepts:

vocabulary
sequencing
problem solving
illustration study
adjectives
verbs (regular past tense)
verbs (compound phrases)
prepositional phrases
point of view
complex sentence structures
text features
phonological awareness
rhyming
inferencing
predicting

Sequencing:

order of what to do if there’s a fire

Vocabulary:

creek, veered, smacked, sheepishly, polite, oodles, tidy, incredible, crept, replace, fire crew, douse, shame, heights

Grammar:

adjectives
verbs (regular past tense)
verbs (compound phrases)
prepositional phrases
point of view
complex sentence structures

Text Features:

“The Dragon’s Fire Safety Rhyme” in the back of the book.
A fire safety checklist to discuss.

exclamation points
ellipsis
animated text for “a-a-a-choooo!”
dialogue

Phonological Awareness:

rhyming

Inferencing:

Why would the girl be afraid?
Why might the girl’s mom be nervous about the dragon’s size?
Why is it not safe for the dragon to hide?
Why do you think the girl wanted to meet by the tree? (what’s the significance of having a meeting spot?)
Why do you think the dragon is going back for his toy bear?
Why do you think the crew checked all of the rooms?
Why will the dragon and girl meet at the bay the next time they play?
Why will she never again invite a dragon to tea?

Predicting:

What do you think the girl and dragon will play?
Do you think the girl and the dragon will make a mess?
What do you think might happen when the dragon sneezes?
What will happen after the now?
Do you think the girl will know what to do?
Who will help with the house fire?

Problem Solving:

The girl and her mom help the dragon to problem solve how to safely escape the fire.
The girl develops a plan for how to still hang out with the dragon without risking a house fire again.

If you are interested in seeing other fire safety books to use in therapy, then check out the Themed Key Teaching Points Book List for a printable copy.