speech and language teaching concepts for Enemy Pie in speech therapy

Frequent Speech Sounds:

/n/ initial
/j/ initial
/r/ initial and medial

Themes:

kindness
friendship

Book Details:

Diverse Characters: N/A
Age Recommendation: Elementary

Enemy Pie

By Derek Munson

Teach kindness, courtesy, respect, and friendship: It was the perfect summer. That is, until Jeremy Ross moved into the house down the street and became neighborhood enemy number one. Luckily Dad had a surefire way to get rid of enemies: Enemy Pie. But part of the secret recipe is spending an entire day playing with the enemy! In this funny yet endearing story one little boy learns an effective recipe for turning a best enemy into a best friend. Accompanied by charming illustrations, Enemy Pie serves up a sweet lesson in the difficulties and ultimate rewards of making new friends.

This clever kindness book can be used in speech therapy to address social/emotional issues like not judging someone before you get to know them and making friends. It is also great for noticing character expressions and for targeting predicting as well as for character analysis! Discover more of the speech and language teaching concepts for using Enemy Pie in speech therapy below:

Key Teaching concepts

Narrative Structure:

complete episode​

Narrative Concepts:

vocabulary​
theme/message
character analysis​
inferencing​
social/emotional​
predicting​
verbs (action)
verbs (regular past tense)
verbs (irregular past tense)
verbs (mental state)

Vocabulary:

perfect, enemy, disgusting, awful, wonder, poisonous, relieved

Character Analysis:

The young boy learns to make friends with his neighbor even when he doesn’t like him. He feels hurt and jealous at first, but when they start hanging out with each other after his dad tricks him, he realizes that he has made a new friend.

Social/Emotional:

The young boy gives his new neighbor a chance and befriends him in the end by going out of his comfort zone and spending time together.

Grammar:

verbs (action)
verbs (regular past tense)
verbs (irregular past tense)
verbs (mental state)

Inferencing:

How did he feel about Jeremy Ross? Why?
What does dad think about all the ingredients his son brings?
What does the boy think about them?
Why do you think the dad says no to his items?
Why was he confused when it smelled good?
How does he feel on the way to Jeremy’s house?
Why was Jeremy surprised?
How do they feel playing together?
What does he think when Jeremy asks to go in the tree house?
What did he think when Jeremy was about to eat the pie?
Why do you think dad made the pie all along?

Predicting:

What do you think happened to make his summer not perfect?
How do you think you make enemy pie?
What do you think the dad will use?
What kind of pie do you think it really is?
What do you think his job will be?
What do you think Jeremy will say when he shows up to hang out with him with pie?
Do you think he will let Jeremy inside the tree house?
What do you think will happen when they eat the pie?